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Chapter 20 Setting Up the Network

Creating a Server

Creating a Workgroup

Creating and Modifying User Accounts

Changing a Server's Workgroup

Managing Servers

Sharing Directories

Sharing Printers


This chapter explains how to set up the network and how to change the network configuration. Before setting up your network, it is recommended that you read the previous chapter in this manual, Chapter 19, "Planning Your Network."

If you ran SETUP /FIRST after you installed the network, as described in the section "After Configuring" on page 3-10, you have already set up a basic network and the following are true:

You may find that this network is sufficient for your needs. If so, refer to the sections "Managing Servers" on page 20-14, "Sharing Directories" on page 20-24, and "Sharing Printers" on page 20-32 to learn how to set these up for use. If you do not want every user of the workgroup to have administrative privileges, or if you want to create other accounts in the workgroup, refer to "Creating and Modifying User Accounts" on page 20-6.

If you did not use SETUP /FIRST, you must set up the network as described in this chapter. The tasks you need to perform to set up the network are listed as follows in the best order for doing them.

Creating a Server

When you install Personal NetWare , you create a server by selecting the option Share this computer's resources. You can choose to share any of your drives or printers. To create a server on a computer, if you did not select this option during installation, run SETUP and choose the option Share this computer's resources.

Note that when you add a computer to an existing workgroup, at least one server must be switched on and running in the workgroup in order for SETUP to be able to detect the workgroup.

Once a server is created, its owner should be aware of the following obligations to other users.

If this is the first server on the network, leave it running while other users install Personal NetWare.

Creating a Workgroup

When you create the first server on the network, you can create a new workgroup for this server by using SETUP /FIRST immediately after configuring, and entering a name for the workgroup. If you do not use SETUP /FIRST, or if you later create another workgroup, the local server (that is, the server that is loaded on the computer in front of you) becomes the first server in the new workgroup.

Before you can create a workgroup you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* Make sure the server that you want to add to the workgroup is loaded.

If a workgroup has been created already, and the server has been added to it, you must also

* Log in to the server's current workgroup.

* Make sure you are the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

Also, you should have decided the following:

Routes are the identifiers used for network communications. If your network boards are all the same type and connected to the same network, you only need one route to address them. You will need multiple routes only if you have a complex configuration, including a router or a NetWare® server acting as a router. In those cases, whoever installed the NetWare or other network should be able to advise you about routes.

If you reset the user database the following occur:

If you do not reset the user database

You can create a new workgroup from DOS or MS Windows.

Creating a Workgroup from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. If this is the first workgroup you are creating, ignore Step 3 and proceed to Step 4.

3. If you are not logged in, you can log in now by choosing Login... from the Workgroup menu.

4. Choose Create... from the Workgroup menu.

5. Type in the new workgroup's name.

6. Select whether to move the existing shared resources, if any, to the new workgroup.

7. Select whether to copy the known routes to the new workgroup.

8. Select whether to reset the user database.

9. Choose the <OK> button to proceed.

The server is now in the new workgroup. The next step is to create user accounts in the new workgroup.

If the SUPERVISOR account does not have a password yet, give a password for the SUPERVISOR account now. The section, "Creating and Modifying User Accounts" on page 20-6, describes how to assign passwords.

Creating a Workgroup from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

To choose an object, double-click it or highlight it and press <Enter>.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

Note that if the <Include non-connected resources> button is selected, you can adjust the widths of both sides of the window. The left side shows current connections, the right side shows other objects.

3. If you are creating the first workgroup, ignore Step 4 and proceed to Step 5.

4. Select an existing workgroup.

5. From the File menu, choose New..., or press <Ins>.

The Create New dialog appears.

6. In the Type list box, choose Workgroup.

7. In the Name text box, enter a name for the new workgroup.

8. Choose the <OK> button.

9. In the Create Workgroup dialog which appears

9a. Choose whether to move the existing shared resources to the new workgroup.

9b. Choose whether to copy the known routes to the new workgroup.

9c. Choose whether to reset the user database.

9d. Choose the <OK> button.

The server is now in the new workgroup. The next step is to create user accounts in the new workgroup.

If the SUPERVISOR account does not have a password yet, give a password for the SUPERVISOR account now. The following section, "Creating and Modifying User Accounts," describes how to assign passwords.

Creating and Modifying User Accounts

Users with workgroup administrator privileges (such as SUPERVISOR) can create, modify, disable, or delete a workgroup's user accounts.

If you have NetWare on your network, you should use the same account usernames that already exist in NetWare, so that you can use the one-time login facility.

Before you can create or modify a user account

CHECKLIST:
* You must be logged in to the appropriate workgroup.

* You must have workgroup administrator privileges.

* Decide whether to give the user workgroup administrator privileges. A workgroup administrator can

You can create or modify an account from DOS or MS Windows.

Creating or Modifying an Account from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. If you are not logged in, you can log in now by choosing Login... from the Workgroup menu.

3. Choose Users from the View menu.

4. Refer to the following table for information about what to do next.
To

Do this

Create a user account

1. Choose Add... from the File menu or press <Ins>.

The Add User dialog appears.

2. Type the username (up to 15 characters, no spaces) and choose <OK>.

The Account Properties dialog appears.

3. Complete the dialog as described on page 20-9.

Modify a user account

1. Select a username from the list.

2. Choose Properties... from the File menu or press <Alt><Enter>.

The Account Properties dialog appears.

3. Complete the dialog as described on page 20-9.

Rename an account

1. Select a username from the list.

2. Choose Rename... from the File menu or press <F3>.

3. Edit the name field in the dialog that appears.

Delete a user account

1. Select a username from the list.

2. Choose Delete... from the File menu or press <Del>.

The Account Properties dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

User's full name

Provides the user's full name.

Account disabled

Allows you to disable an account temporarily.

Workgroup Administrator

Gives the user workgroup administrator privileges.

Allow to change password

Allows the user to change their own password. Normally enabled, but you should disable it for GUEST accounts.

Password required

Ensures the account always has a password.

<Login Times...>

Allows you to specify, in half hour units, when this user is allowed to be logged in. During a restricted time the user cannot log in.

<Password...>

Allows you to give the account a new password. Note that you do not have to know its existing password.

Min. length, Unique, Changes required, and Days between changes

Control passwords to ensure security standards are maintained. Uniqueness tests that an old password is not reused. Changes required forces a user to change the password regularly.

5. If you are creating a workgroup, configure the server next, as described in "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

Creating or Modifying an Account from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Double-click the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window to select it and show its objects.

4. Refer to the following table for information about what to do next.
To

Do this

Create a user account

1. From the File menu, choose New..., or press <Ins>.

The Create New dialog appears.

2. In the Type list box, select User.

3. In the Name text box, type the username (up to 15 characters, no spaces).

4. Choose the <OK> button.

The Account Configuration dialog appears.

5. Complete the dialog as described on page 20-11.

NOTE: The account has no password initially. Set it, if required, as described next.

Set a user's password

1. Select the relevant username from the list in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Properties..., or press <Enter>.

3. Choose the <Set Pass...> button on the User Information dialog.

The Set Password dialog appears.

4. Complete the dialog. You must type the new password twice to ensure that it is correct.

Modify a user account

1. Select the relevant username from the list in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Properties..., or press <Enter>.

3. Choose the <Configure...> button.

The Account Configuration dialog appears.

4. Complete the dialog as described on page 20-11.

Delete a user account

1. Select a username from the list in the NetWare window.

2. Choose Delete... from the File menu or press <Del>.

The Account Configuration dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Login name

The username which the user types when logging in. Must be one word of up to 15 characters.

User's full name:

Provides the user's full name.

Account disabled

Allows you to disable an account temporarily.

Workgroup Administrator

Gives the user workgroup administrator privileges.

Allow to change password

Allows the user to change their own password. Normally enabled, but you should disable it for GUEST accounts.

Password required

Ensures the account always has a password.

Min. length, Unique, Changes required, and Days between changes

Control passwords to ensure security standards are maintained. Uniqueness tests that an old password is not reused. Changes required forces a user to change the password regularly.

5. If you are creating a workgroup, configure the server next, as described in "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

Changing a Server's Workgroup

After creating a workgroup, move those servers to it whose resources you want to share with users in that workgroup. You can also change the workgroup of any server at any other time.

Before you can move a server to a new workgroup, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must be working on the server whose workgroup you want to change.

* You must log in to the server's current workgroup, if any.

* You must be the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

* At least one server in the workgroup to which you want to move must be available (running).

* You must have a username and password for the workgroup to which you want to move the server.

You can change a server's workgroup from DOS or MS Windows.

Changing a Server's Workgroup from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Select your server from the list.

3. Choose Properties... from the File menu, or press <Enter>.

4. In the Server Properties dialog, choose the <Set Workgroup...> button.

The dialog that appears lists all the local workgroups in which at least one server is running. It does not, initially, list remote workgroups on a wide area network.

5. To include remote workgroups, choose the <Find workgroup...> button. This may take a minute or more.

6. Select the required workgroup from the list.

7. Select whether to move the existing shared resources to the new workgroup.

If you do not select this option, the server's shared printer and shared directory information is lost. If the server has no shared resources, this option is not selectable.

8. Choose the <OK> button to continue.

9. Confirm that you want to log out of the old workgroup and in to the new one.

You cannot proceed without doing this.

10. Give your username and password for the new workgroup.

The server is now in the new workgroup.

If you want to create or change shared directories or printers, or to change the rights of users in the workgroup to manage and use the server, refer to the section "Managing Servers" on page 20-14.

Changing a Server's Workgroup from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

To "choose" an object, double-click it or highlight it and press <Enter>.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

Note that if the <Include non-connected resources> button is selected, you can adjust the widths of both sides of the window. The left side shows current connections, the right side shows other objects.

3. Double-click the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window to show its objects.

4. Select the server's name.

5. From the File menu, choose Properties...

The Server Information dialog appears.

6. Choose the <Set Workgroup> button.

The Change Workgroup dialog appears. It lists all local workgroups in which at least one server is available.

7. Choose the <All Workgroups> button if the desired workgroup is not shown because it has no servers on your local network.

8. From the list box, choose the required workgroup.

9. Choose the <OK> button.

The Login dialog appears. You must log in to continue.

10. Type your username, if not shown correctly, and your password.

11. Choose the <OK> button to log in.

12. Choose the <Close> button to close the Server Information dialog.

Managing Servers

When you create a server, you can allow the software to set default values for all settings. With knowledge of your requirements, or by observing network and server statistics, you may be able to choose more optimal values yourself. Also, you can select which users have the rights to manage the server.

As well as configuring a server, you can synchronize server clocks and obtain performance information about the server.

Configuring a Server

You can display the server configuration dialogs to see what the current server settings are, or to change them. Change them only if experience tells you that server performance can be improved by doing so.

Before you can configure the server, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must log in to the server's workgroup.

* You must be the server's owner or have rights to manage the server.

* The server must be available (running).

You can display or change a server's settings from DOS or MS Windows.

Configuring a Server from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Select the server that you want to configure.

If the server is listed as not available, you cannot configure it.

3. Choose Properties... from the File menu, or press <Enter>.

If the Server Properties dialog shows that more than one connection exists, someone else is connected to the server, so you may not be able to reconfigure the server.

4. In the Server Properties dialog, choose the <Configure...> button.

The Server Configuration dialog appears. The dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Description

This can give more information about the server.

Owner

The owner can always configure the server. Only the owner may change this field.

Workgroup Administrator Rights

ALL means any workgroup administrator can configure the server. NONE means they cannot, unless they are named as a Server Manager with rights set to ALL.

Automatic Configuration

Selects one of three sets of server parameters. You can choose between maximum performance, minimum use of memory, or a balance between these.

In the Advanced Settings dialog you can change any of the server configuration parameters that affect memory and performance.

<Server Managers...>

A list of users who are server managers with more or fewer rights than the default. Set the rights to ALL or NONE.

<Advanced Settings...>

Displays the Advanced Settings dialog, which shows settings which you can change in order to improve the server's performance or memory usage. Some of these are explained in "Advanced Server Settings" on page 20-19.

<Loadable Modules...>

Displays a dialog which lets you specify which server components you want to be loaded. You can reduce the amount of memory the server uses by not loading unused modules, but if you load DPMS the modules load in extended memory, so have very little impact on conventional memory.

Renaming a Server from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Select the server that you want to rename.

If the server is listed as not available, you cannot rename it.

3. Choose Rename... from the File menu, or press <F3>.

Configuring a Server from MS Windows

This procedure performs all server configuration functions except for setting which users have the right to configure the server. To set these rights, see "Setting Users' Rights to Configure a Server from MS Windows" on page 20-18.

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Choose (double-click) the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window. This shows the workgroup's objects.

4. Select the server.

5. From the File menu, choose Properties...

The Server Information dialog appears.

6. Choose the <Configure...> button.

The Server Configuration dialog appears. The dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Server Name:

The name all users see in server lists. Make sure no one is connected to the server when you rename it.

Owner:

The owner can always configure the server. Only the owner may change this field.

Description:

A longer name that could give more information about the server.

Allow Server to Load

Can be deselected to disable the server and free up 40 KB or more of memory temporarily. You must reboot the computer before this takes effect, though you can often unload the client and server by typing

VLM /U <Enter>
SERVER U <Enter>

Parameters

Settings which you can change in order to improve the server's performance or memory usage. These are explained in "Advanced Server Settings" on page 20-19.

Modules

Lets you specify which server components you want to be loaded. You can reduce the amount of memory the server uses by not loading unused modules, but if you load DPMS, the modules load in extended memory so have very little impact on conventional memory.

Setting Users' Rights to Configure a Server from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Choose (double-click) the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window. This shows the workgroup's objects.

4. Select the server.

5. From the File menu, choose Rights...

The Rights dialog appears, showing workgroup administrators' rights and a list of all users.

6. To change the rights of all workgroup administrators, except those explicitly excluded in Step 7, change the READ and WRITE settings together.

7. To change the rights of any user, select the user from the list, then give them one of the following rights:

Advanced Server Settings

The advanced settings allow you to fine-tune server performance. In most cases, the default server configuration values provide suitable performance. Change them only if performance deteriorates.

Before changing settings for a server, make sure you know the statistics and configuration settings that are related to the performance problem. You can obtain statistics about network traffic and server performance by displaying the server Statistics dialog, as described in "Obtaining Performance Statistics" on page 20-20.

The following are examples of situations that could require you to change the server configuration:

Obtaining Performance Statistics

Once a server has been running, you can display information about its performance measurements. You can then use these in deciding how to improve performance, as described in "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

Before you can view the server's performance statistics, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must log in to the server's workgroup.

* You must be the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

You can display the performance statistics from DOS or MS Windows.

To Display the Performance Statistics from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. In the Servers view, select the required server.

3. Choose Properties... from the File menu, or press <Enter>.

4. In the Server Properties dialog, choose the <Statistics...> button.

The statistics show the cumulative and current values and the configured limits. These are explained in "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

5. In the Server Statistics dialog, choose the <Next...> button to see more statistics.

To Display the Performance Statistics from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Choose (double-click) the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window. This shows the workgroup's objects.

4. Select the server.

5. From the File menu, choose Properties...

The Server Information dialog appears.

6. Choose the <Statistics...> button.

The Server Statistics dialog appears, showing current and cumulative values and configured limits. These are explained in "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

Setting a Server's Local Security

Network clients can only access the shared resources on a server, according to the user's rights. The person sitting at the server's keyboard can perform many more operations on the server. If you are concerned about the security of a server, you can restrict the operations that different users can perform at its keyboard by enabling security.

Before you can set local security for a server, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* The computer must have security enabled. To enable security, use SETUP.

* You must be working on the server for which you want to set local user security.

* You must log in to the server's workgroup.

* You must be the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

To set local security for a server, do the following:

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Choose Machine Security from the Workgroup menu.

The Local Security dialog appears. It has a list of local users who are allowed to use the computer. Initially, the list is empty. You may add names, delete them, or modify their rights. Each user may be given rights to log in, to use the diskette drives and serial and parallel ports, and to have a one-time login script.

If there is at least one local user, you are asked for your name and password whenever the computer is rebooted. If not, you are asked for the Master Key password.

Synchronizing Server Clocks

Some applications, such as databases, depend on accurate time-stamping of files. If you are saving files on different computers, it can be important that their clocks are synchronized.

Before you can synchronize the server clocks, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must log in to the workgroup.

* You must have workgroup administrator privileges.

You can synchronize server clocks from DOS or MS Windows.

To Synchronize Server Clocks from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Choose Sync Server Time... from the Workgroup menu.

A dialog appears in which you can set the current date and time.

3. Choose the <OK> button to set all servers in the workgroup to this date and time.

To Synchronize Server Clocks from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Select the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window.

4. From the File menu, choose Properties...

The Workgroup Connection Information dialog appears.

5. Choose the <Sync Servers> button.

The Date and Time Synchronization dialog appears.

6. Set the correct date and time, then choose the <OK> button to synchronize servers to that time.

Sharing Directories

Server owners can share DOS directories, subdirectories, and files on their hard drives (including CD-ROM drives) with other users in the same workgroup.

The server owner, or any other user with the right to manage the server, specifies that the drive or directory is to be shared, gives it a name, and specifies who can access it. Then, any user who logs in can connect to the shared directory, if they have the rights to do so, by mapping an unused DOS drive letter to it. All references subsequently made to files or subdirectories on that drive actually refer to files or subdirectories within the shared directory on the server.

You can use shared directories for many purposes, including the following:

Directory Security

You can choose which workgroup users are allowed to access each of your directories and what type of access they have. For example, all workgroup administrators might be given read and write access, while GUEST can only read.

You cannot individually set access rights to each file in a shared directory, but you can set access rights to subdirectories within a shared directory. You do this by declaring a subdirectory to be a shared directory itself. For example, even if all users have all rights to C:\PUBLIC, you could restrict C:\PUBLIC\PRIVATE to be readable only by yourself by making it a shared directory in its own right. If C:\PUBLIC\PRIVATE was not a shared directory, then access rights to it would be the same as to C:\PUBLIC.

There are four levels of access rights, any of which may be made the default or given to certain named users. They are as follows:
Access Right

Description

ALL (READ - WRITE)

Users can perform all operations on files in the directory.

WRITE

Users can create new files and write to existing files. They cannot read or execute existing files, or scan the directory.

READ

Users can read and execute existing files and scan the directory.

NONE

Users can connect to the directory but they have no rights in it. Users can have rights to a subdirectory within it, if the subdirectory itself is made a shared directory.

If you want to restrict access to a shared directory, assign READ, WRITE, or NONE as the default user access rights, and specify the usernames of anyone who is to have ALL rights.

You cannot access password-protected files (on servers running Novell DOS ) across the network.

Naming Shared Directories

When you create a shared directory, you give it a name which should describe the contents of the directory to help users locate applications and files.

NOTE: Do not confuse the name of the shared directory with its DOS name. For example, the DOS path C:\PUBLIC\CUST.DAT identifies a directory called CUST.DAT which could be given the name NEW_CUSTOMERS as a shared directory.

It is sometimes best not to include the name of the server in the name of the directory. Excluding the server name makes it possible to move a directory to another server without having to change workgroup users' batch files to access the moved directory, although login scripts explicitly specify server names.

Creating, Modifying, and Removing Shared Directories

Before you can manage shared directories, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must log in to the server's workgroup.

* You must be the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

* Before deleting or moving a shared directory, make sure that no user has an open connection to it. Refer to "Closing Down Your Server" on page 21-42.

You can manage shared directories from DOS or MS Windows.

To Create, Modify or Delete a Shared Directory from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Choose Shared Directories from the View menu.

The screen changes to show all existing shared directories on all servers in your workgroup.

3. The following table shows the procedures for managing shared directories.
To

Do this

Share an existing directory or create a shared directory

1. Choose Add... from the File menu or press <Ins>.

The Add Shared Directory dialog appears.

2. Type a name for the directory and select the server it is on, then choose the <OK> button. The name need not be the same as the directory's DOS name. It may have up to 15 characters, but no spaces.

The Directory Properties dialog appears.

3. Type the actual DOS path or choose the <Browse Path...> button to see the list of directories on the server. If the directory does not already exist, you may create it now by choosing the <Create...> button on the Browse Path dialog.

4. Complete the Directory Properties dialog according to what you want to do.

Modify access rights to a shared directory

1. Select the directory from the list.

2. Choose Properties... from the File menu or press <Alt><Enter>.

The Directory Properties dialog appears.

3. Complete the dialog according to what you want to do.

Move a shared directory to a different location on the same server

1. Select the directory from the list.

2. Choose Properties... from the File menu or press <Alt><Enter>.

3. Edit the DOS path.

Rename a shared directory

1. Select the directory from the list.

2. Choose Rename... from the File menu or press <F3>.

3. Edit the name in the dialog that appears.

This affects the name other network users see, not the DOS name.

Stop sharing a directory

1. Select the directory from the list.

2. Choose Delete... from the File menu or press <Del>.

This does not delete the DOS directory or any of its contents. It merely stops network users connecting to it.

The Directory Properties dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Default Access Rights

Sets the rights of all users except those listed in <User Rights...>.

Refer to "Directory Security" on page 20-25.

<Browse Path...>

Shows you all existing DOS directories. Allows you to select one of these or to create a new one.

<User Rights...>

Lets you control who may do what with a directory. Typically used either to give the server owner more rights or to give guests fewer rights than the default.

The User Rights dialog lists all users who have non-default rights. You can add or remove usernames and modify individual users' rights.

Suggested Drive

Allows you to specify the drive letter to which users should map this directory. This is only used if the mapping is made by the NET MAP command without specifying a drive letter.

To Create, Modify or Delete a Shared Directory from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Choose (double-click) the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window. This shows the workgroup's objects.

4. The following table shows the procedures for managing shared directories.
To

Do this

Share an existing directory

1. Choose (double-click) the required server's icon. This shows its drives.

2. Choose the required drive icon to show its first level directories.

3. If necessary, choose the required directory icon to show lower level subdirectories. Repeat until the required subdirectory is visible.

4. From the File menu, choose Share...

The Share dialog appears, showing the name by which the directory will be known on the network. By default, this name is the same as its DOS name.

5. If desired, type a name for the directory. The name need not be the same as the directory's DOS name. It can have up to 15 characters, but no spaces.

6. Choose the <OK> button. The Rights dialog appears.

7. Set the default rights for all unspecified users.

8. If desired, set the rights of specific users by selecting the user's name, then setting a combination of read and/or write rights. Repeat for all the users who are to have non-default rights.

9. Choose the <Close> button on the Rights dialog.

The directory is now shared. It will appear in the NetWare and Drives windows of all the workgroup's users.

Modify access rights to a shared directory

1. Select the directory in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Rights...

The Rights dialog appears.

3. Set the default rights for all unspecified users.

4. To set the rights of a specific user, select the user's name, then set a combination of read and/or write rights. Repeat for all the users who are to have non-default rights.

5. Choose the <Close> button.

Stop sharing a directory

1. Select the directory in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Delete... or press <Del>.

Note that this does not delete the DOS directory or any of its contents. It merely stops network users connecting to it.

Sharing an Application

One of the uses of a shared directory is to share an application. This allows you to keep just one copy of the application on a server. It is easier to maintain, and saves disk space on users' computers.

Many applications, however, need special attention if installed onto a network server. Consider the following:

Before installing an application, know the hardware configurations of the computers that will use it.

Assume you are installing the application TESTAPP.EXE, for example, and the installation program asks what kind of monitor will be used with the application. Some of the computers on your network might have a VGA screen, but others have EGA. You should install TESTAPP.EXE for EGA, because VGA screens can display EGA, but not vice versa.

If you are a client, connected to the server and have ALL (or READ and WRITE) rights for the directory onto which you want to install the application, you can install applications that do not read or modify system files. In general, though, it is easier if the server owner installs the application onto its hard disk, then shares the directory it is in. The procedure described below follows this method.

Before you can share an application, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
* You must be working on the server where you want to install the application.

* You must be the server owner, or have rights to manage the server.

To share an application, do the following:

1. Install the application on a hard drive.

1a. Follow the installation instructions in the documentation for the application.

1b. If the application's installation program prompts you for your network type, select the DOS-based (or "other," IBM* COMPATIBLE, NETBIOS, or PEER-TO-PEER) option instead of the NetWare option.

1c. Make sure the server's AUTOEXEC.BAT loads SHARE with sufficient locks and file handles (/L and /F parameters), depending on how many files the application opens simultaneously.

Refer to the description of the SHARE command in the "Command Reference" chapter of DOSBook.

1d. Separate shared and non-shared files into different directories.

Ideally, each user's preference and configuration files should be stored on their own hard disks, not on the server. The application's installation instructions should tell you how best to achieve this.

1e. Make sure you have sufficient connections and tasks on the server to do the job.

Refer to "Configuring a Server" on page 20-14.

2. Log in to the server's workgroup.

3. Make the application directory shared with READ access.

Refer to "Sharing Directories" on page 20-24. Make the default access rights READ, to allow multiple users to run the application simultaneously. If, for some reason, you have to allow users to write to the directory, you could make executable files read-only using the ATTRIB command. Refer to the "Command Reference" chapter of DOSBook for a description of ATTRIB.

4. Tell users the name of the shared directory, so they can connect to it and run the application as described in "Using Shared Directories and NetWare Volumes" on page 21-8.

Sharing Printers

Any printer attached to a server's parallel ports or serial ports can be shared with other users of the workgroup. The network software ensures that each print job is complete before it is printed, so that the printouts do not become muddled. It can also print a banner, identifying the user, before each job, and can tell the user when printing is complete.

If you have NetWare on your network, you might prefer to use NetWare's facilities for sharing printers because they are more comprehensive.

When you send a file to print on a shared printer, that file is stored as a print job in a print queue. The print queue stores each print job until the printer is ready to print it.

IMPORTANT: Note that if you want to print on a printer which, while physically attached to your computer, is being shared with other network users, you must not do so by sending your output to the printer's physical port. You must connect to it as a shared printer, as described in "Using Shared Printers and NetWare Print Queues" on page 21-18.

Creating and Modifying Shared Printers

Before you can share a printer, you must do the following:

CHECKLIST:
You must log in to the server's workgroup.

* You must be the server owner or have rights to manage the server.

* Before deleting or moving a shared printer, make sure that there are no print jobs waiting to print in the print queue, and that no user has an open connection to it. Refer to "Closing Down Your Server" on page 21-42.

You can manage shared printers from DOS or MS Windows.

To Create, Modify or Delete a Shared Printer from DOS

1. At the system prompt, type

NET ADMIN <Enter>

The Workgroup Administration program loads, showing the Servers view. To display online help, press <F1>.

2. Choose Shared Printers from the View menu.

The screen changes to show all existing shared printers on all servers in your workgroup.

3. Refer to the following table to see what to do next.
To

Do this

Share a printer

1. Choose Add... from the File menu or press <Ins>.

The Add Shared Printer dialog appears.

2. Type a name for the printer. The name should tell users which printer it is or what they should use it for.

3. Select the server and the actual port to which the printer is physically connected, then choose the <OK> button.

The Printer Properties dialog appears.

4. Complete the dialog as described in the following table.

Modify a shared printer's settings

1. Select the printer from the list.

2. Choose Properties... from the File menu or press <Alt><Enter>.

The Printer Properties dialog appears.

3. Complete the dialog as described in the following table.

Move a printer to a different port or server

1. Stop sharing the printer, as described next.

2. Move the printer's interface cable to the desired port/server.

3. Follow the steps in "Share a printer" above. Give it the same name as before.

Rename a shared printer

1. Select the printer from the list.

2. Choose Rename... from the File menu or press <F3>.

3. Edit the name in the dialog that appears.

Stop sharing a printer

1. Select the printer from the list.

2. Choose Delete... from the File menu or press <Del>.

The Printer Properties dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Server Port:

Shows you to which port the printer is physically attached.

Default Access Rights:

Sets the user rights to the printer except for those explicitly listed in <User Rights...>. ALL means users can use the printer and modify their own jobs in the queue. NONE means a user cannot use the printer.

Characters Per Second

Sets the maximum rate at which characters will be sent to the printer. Up to a point, increasing this will improve printer performance. Beyond that point, it will merely interrupt the server unnecessarily, and so slow the computer down.

Error Wait Time

The time, in seconds, that the server waits for a printer that is not accepting data. At the end of this time, a message pops up on the server's screen, alerting the owner to the problem.

<Serial Settings...>

Allows you to set the parameters of the serial port. This only applies to printers attached to COM1 or COM2.

<User Rights...>

Allows you to give non-default access rights to users for the printer.

<Setup Strings...>

Lets you create and name one or more strings of characters which will be sent to the printer at the start of any job that requests it.

The names are those that users select in the Printer Settings dialog of the NET program; see "Connecting to a Printer" on page 21-19.

The string is a sequence of two-character hexadecimal numbers representing bytes, separated by spaces. For example:

0A 0D

<Form Names...>

Lets you give names to the paper or form types that the printer uses.

When a print job requires a form other than the one currently loaded, a pop-up message on the server's screen requests the server's owner to change the paper manually to the specified form.

<Advanced Info...>

Displays additional settings that you can use to change the way the printer is set up.

· Startup Form Name is the form type which is assumed to be loaded into the printer at start-up.

· Old Print Jobs allows you to hold, delete or print jobs which are still in the queue from the previous session when the server starts up.

· Use Console Timeout allows you to say for how long pop-ups should be displayed on the server's screen.

· Spool Location allows you to specify in which directory the print queue's spool files should be placed.

To Create, Modify or Delete a Shared Printer from MS Windows

1. In Program Manager, choose the Personal NetWare icon in the Personal NetWare group window.

2. Open the NetWare window, unless it is already open.

From the Window menu, choose NetWare, or double-click the NetWare icon in the main window.

3. Choose (double-click) the workgroup's icon in the NetWare window. This shows the workgroup's objects.

4. The following table shows the procedures for managing shared printers.
To

Do this

Share a printer

1. Choose (double-click) the required server's icon to show its printer ports.

2. Select the port to which the printer is attached.

3. From the File menu, choose Share...

The Share dialog appears, showing the name by which the printer will be known on the network. By default, this name is the same as its DOS port number.

4. Type a name for the printer. The name can have up to 15 characters, but no spaces.

5. Choose the <OK> button. The Rights dialog appears. See "Modify access rights to a printer" Steps 3 to 5, below.

The printer is now shared. It will appear in the NetWare window of all the workgroup's users.

6. (Optionally) confirm or change the print queue's configuration. See "Configure a print queue" on page 20-37.

Modify access rights to a printer

1. Select the printer in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Rights...

The Rights dialog appears.

3. Set the default rights for all unspecified users, either to both read and write or to neither.

4. If desired, set the rights of specific users by selecting the user's name, then setting both read and write rights on or off. Repeat for all the users who are to have non-default rights.

5. Choose the <Close> button.

Configure a print queue

1. Select the printer from the NetWare window or the Printers window.

2. From the File menu, choose Properties...

The Print Queue Configuration dialog appears. It is described in the table below.

3. Choose the <Close> button.

Stop sharing a printer

1. Select the printer in the NetWare window.

2. From the File menu, choose Delete... or press <Del>.

The Print Queue Configuration dialog has the following fields:
Field

Purpose

Startup Form Name

The form type which is assumed to be loaded into the printer at start-up. This field is blank if no forms are defined for the printer.

Forms...

Opens the Forms window in which you can specify the names of forms.

Characters Per Second

Sets the maximum rate at which characters will be sent to the printer. Up to a point, increasing this will improve printer performance. Beyond that point, it will merely interrupt the server unnecessarily, and so slow the computer down.

Error Wait Time

The time, in seconds, that the server waits for a printer that is not accepting data. At the end of this time, a message pops up on the server's screen, alerting the owner to the problem.

Console Timeout

Allows you to say for how long pop-ups should be displayed on the server's screen. The default is forever.

Spool Location

Allows you to specify in which directory the print queue's spool files should be placed.

Old Print Jobs

Allows you to hold, delete or print jobs which are still in the queue from the previous session when the server starts up.



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