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Chapter 19 Planning Your Network

How Many Workgroups Are Required?

Which Computers Should Be Servers?

Should Security Be Enabled and Where?

Which Workgroup for Each Server?

Which Printers Should Be Shared?

Should Printers Be Moved?

Which Accounts Should Be Created?


This chapter is aimed at the person who is responsible for installing and maintaining the network. To get the most out of Personal NetWare(TM) , it is worth doing some planning before configuring the software. Before you start creating servers, workgroups, and user accounts, consider your answers to the following questions:

All of these issues are discussed in this chapter. Also consider who should make the decisions; it may make sense to appoint someone to ensure that the workgroup and server names you create are unique and helpful. It may also be more efficient and secure for one person to do all the software installation.

How Many Workgroups Are Required?

Unless you have a very large number of computers or are concerned about security, you should create just one workgroup to start with. You can create more workgroups later and move specific servers and users between workgroups. You must give each workgroup a name (up to 15 characters).

If you decide to create several workgroups, remember that a user can only log in to one at a time so only one set of resources or another can be used.

The networks on different sites can be connected together through devices called routers. For the best performance and security, you should create different workgroups at different sites. Users at one site can log in to workgroups at another site, however.

If you have NetWare(R) 2.x, 3.x or 4.x, you may prefer to use Personal NetWare to create NetWare clients only. You need to create workgroups only if you want Personal NetWare (desktop) servers. You can use Personal NetWare or NetWare commands to control NetWare.

Which Computers Should Be Servers?

If you want the greatest flexibility, you should make every computer in the network a server. Only a server can share its disks, directories and printers, so if two users want to share data it is easiest if both of them are servers.

The costs of making a computer a server are that its user may notice a performance degradation when other users are accessing it, and that the server software occupies memory while it is running. The amount of memory available to DOS applications is reduced by
40 KB or more. Consider these factors when deciding how many servers you need and which computers to make servers.

Should Security Be Enabled and Where?

It is recommended that you enable security on any computer that is to be a server. Do this to prevent someone impersonating the owner of the server and gaining unauthorized access to it. When you enable security on a server, it is the network software that validates user access rights, whether the user is trying to log in at the keyboard or over the network.

Access over the network to any server is controlled by two further levels of security. Firstly, users must log in by typing a username and password (which is never displayed on the screen), and secondly every shared resource can have a list of specific users who are allowed to read and/or write it.

You can use the same username and password to log in to the network as the ones you use to start up your computer. This is referred to as ``one-time login.'' Logging in this way is easier and secure because it encrypts your password as soon as you type it. Refer to Chapter 14, ``Securing Information,'' for detailed information about the security features available on each computer and how they work.

NOTE: If you are concerned about security, give the SUPERVISOR account a password as soon as you create the first workgroup; by default, it has none.

Which Workgroup for Each Server?

Unless you have only one workgroup, you need to decide which workgroup to place each server in. You must also give this information to network users. Remember that you can change a server's workgroup at any time.

Which Printers Should Be Shared?

When you decide which printers to share, make sure you inform network users of the printer names, locations, and suggested uses.

Printers are attached to servers. They are available to the members of the server's workgroup.

Should Printers Be Moved?

You may want to move printers to more accessible locations before setting up the network. Any printer that needs its paper type changed often, for example, should be physically located near someone who is willing to do this.

Which Accounts Should Be Created?

The workgroups you create will probably reflect existing divisions within your organization. Remember the following when deciding which accounts to create within a workgroup:

As well as creating accounts for individual network users, you may want to create special-purpose accounts, such as a GUEST account. A GUEST account must not have workgroup administrator privileges.



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